Procrastination

State Street Brats!

herbgardening:

hippie-galaxy:

This is perfect.

YES

herbgardening:

hippie-galaxy:

This is perfect.

YES

a-traveshamockery:

Right now, the American Red Cross has an urgent need for blood and platelet donors to prevent an emergency shortage. Here’s how to help patients in need:

  1. Make an appointment to give at RedCrossBlood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). All blood types are needed.
  2. Share this post. Let your friends & family know their help is needed now.
  3. Bring a friend! If every donor now through the end of summer brought a friend to donate, we could prevent an emergency situation.

reasonsmysoniscrying:

90% of my life is closing doors or telling my kids to close doors (and then telling them to close doors more gently next time).

Gpoy

Really? I guess I missed how me and all my liberal friends just sit around talking about our lady parts. My bad.

Really? I guess I missed how me and all my liberal friends just sit around talking about our lady parts. My bad.

whatshouldwecalllaboranddelivery:

I have to be honest that articles like this can downright hurt my feelings sometimes. And really, this sort of fear mongering is not going to be helpful to people when they DO have to be in the hospital (say, a home birth or birthing center transfer). 

I can’t help but respond:

  • #1 You don’t need to listen to your hospital staff.
  • Even if your water breaks naturally at home, or wherever you might be, you might find that when you arrive at the hospital, get all checked in, in a hospital bed all hooked up, you might hear your nurse or doctor start talking about “starting your Pitocin drip.” If you hear this, get angry.  I mean it, look at your doctor or nurse and ask them why in the hell a woman who has naturally started laboring need a drug to induce labor?

Why GET ANGRY?  Why not, “Ask your nurse or physician if: is it really necessary to start pitocin at this time?”  IF a woman is laboring naturally, then OF COURSE we wouldn’t start pitocin.  Pitocin is for a woman who does not seem to be laboring.

I just reiterated this fact to a family last night: You are in control of your care!!!  We will inform you and make recommendations, but ultimately, if you don’t want to take them, then don’t!  But we’re going to educate you and encourage you in the way that we think will get us the best outcome: healthy and whole mommy and baby.

I know people think Pitocin is the devil.  Pitocin used incorrectly is the devil.  What most of the pregnant population doesn’t realize is that nurses operate under a very strict set of rules when we are using pitocin.  I’ve never worked at a hospital (not that they don’t maybe exist), where pitocin is a casual drug that we just pump patients full of at the endangerment of baby.

Also this “don’t listen to hospital staff,” if you really abhor the medical staff that much, there’s other birthing options for you out there! Birthing centers and home births with QUALIFIED midwives may be a better option for you.  Believe me, we don’t want a patient who doesn’t feel safe or like they can trust us!  That doesn’t make for a good relationship in a VERY intimate setting for one of the MOST important days in your life!  This is supposed to be happy! You’re meeting your baby(ies) and if you feel like you can’t happily do that in a hospital, then don’t.  But we’re really not the evil doers this article makes us out to be.

  • You can eat. It will not hurt you or anyone else. Doctors and nurses make it seem like it will kill you, or like it’s even necessary, and that again is for their own personal agenda.

I ALWAYS tell my patients, “You can eat, but know that it is very likely to come back up.” The article mentions “convenience” in a C-Section.  How about safety?  A lot of women throw up under anesthesia and we don’t want to risk them breathing it back in! What is this mysterious and sinister “personal agenda” that we (medical staff) have? At least as a nurse, my personal agenda is this: healthy mom and healthy baby. Isn’t that what my patients want too?

  • Try to labor at home as long as possible. When you realize you’re in labor, it’s exciting and you want to get straight to the hospital to see how dilated you are and to get the labor process moving.  Don’t rush. If you can, labor as much as you can at home. Early stages of labor are uncomfortable and painful, but it’s easier to get through in the comfort of your own home than a hospital bed. It can also get you through early labor better and you’ll progress more quickly. 

I agree with this “tip” so much, it’s not even funny.  Especially if you are Group Beta Strep NEGATIVE, wait at home!  Sleep in your own bed!  Eat your own food!  We will recommend you come in if you: are Group Beta Strep POSITIVE, the fluid is not clear, or this is your second (3rd, umpteenth) child and you want an epidural and don’t want to deliver on the freeway.

Be nice to your nurses. They keep your doctor from killing you.